Do your teeth scream out in protest every time you drink something with ice in it, or take a mouthful of ice cream? Is the tooth sensitivity to cold getting to you? In severe cases, the pain can actually feel like an intensely painful electrifying shock that straight goes up to and hits your brain!
 

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Photo Credit:bing.com

You think of the yummy cool drink on a warm summer morning, but the moment you take your first sip, and you curse your luck and your memory for not reminding you, right? Well, basically tooth sensitivity happens because when we don’t take proper care of our teeth, the outer layer that protects it wears out. This exposes tiny, microscopic little ‘tunnels’ that go straight down to the nerves. And in the absence of the protective layer, the cold penetrates straight down to the nerve – and you have this extremely uncomfortable tingle – that goes from tooth to head!

But the question is – what makes your teeth so very severely sensitive?

Let’s give you 8 reasons for it:

  • A little too zealous when it comes to brushing? – Yes too much brushing especially with a hard bristled brush can cause wearing out.
  • A chipped tooth can obviously cause enamel loss – and sensitivity.
  • You eat too many acidic foods – the acid corrodes and in this case it takes the enamel with it!
  • You use too much mouthwash or teeth whitening products – they have the same effect as acidic foods!

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Photo Credit:bing.com

  • You have Bruxism – which basically means you are constantly grinding your teeth… and that naturally takes much of the enamel off!
  • You have gum disease or tooth decay of some form – this also causes the enamel to wear away.
  • Just as too much brushing can cause sensitivity – too little can cause plaque, which also causes decay and sensitivity!
  • Did you get a tooth filling done and don’t take good care of it? Directly under the filling lie your ultra-sensitive nerves. And any chip in the filling or decay around it, can allow the cold to actually ‘touch’ your nerves!

So you see – there are 8 things that you could be doing – and one of these is definitely the cause of your teeth being sensitive to cold foods.

But what does one do when they have tooth sensitivity? No – they don’t stop having the cold stuff, at least not permanently… but they do stuff to tackle the problem instead!

And here is what you can do!

  •  Brush and floss religiously – you need to keep your teeth clean – but use a soft toothbrush.
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Photo Credit:bing.com
 
  •  Watch what you eat – for the time being, you should give acidic foods and cold stuff a wide berth – but that’s not for ever!

  •  Make sure you check the label before buying toothpaste or mouth wash – don’t use stuff that will corrode. And don’t use mouthwash excessively – twice a day is more than adequate!
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Photo Credit:bing.com
 

 
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  •  Go visit a dentist if you have tooth issues ! Whether it is some other sign that indicates gum disease or if  it is a chipped filling – get that diagnosed and the sensitivity will decrease!
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  •  Try and avoid teeth whitening products and toothpaste – they can usually be corrosive on the teeth – try home remedies instead.

And finally – there is the ultimate solution. Certain toothpastes and mouthwashes can actually help to desensitize your teeth – look out for such tooth paste and switch to those. As for mouthwash, go for stuff with fluoride in it, and use it to rinse once a day – that should take care of your tooth sensitivity to cold as well.

Sensitivity is caused by a condition that is difficult to reverse. But it can be done. And if over-the-counter options don’t seem to work – go talk to your dentists, because he does have more effective tricks up his sleeve!

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